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5 Best Examples of VR And AR in Education 

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Virtual Reality or Augmented Reality are two digitally interactive experiences that mix real-world elements with simulated ones. Both of them involve using a few specific gadgets, such as motion controllers, a head-mounting display, and an advanced computer. However, AR is partially virtual, while VR creates a whole new reality. 

VR and AR are mostly known for their use in leisure activities such as gaming. Nevertheless, this advanced technology can also be helpful in education. In fact, VR and AR open new possibilities in the learning world.

For example, VR can present a new world inaccessible in real life. Meanwhile, AR can offer rare experiences that otherwise impose budget and logistic issues. But how is that possible? In this article, you’ll learn more about the five best examples of VR and AR in education.

Using VR/AR For  Scientific Purposes

VR and AR can offer a broad range of practical activities that help students exercise their skills. This is extremely useful for doctors, medical students, nurses, researchers because they can study the body of a living being in the most detailed way without dissecting it.

For instance, Microsoft created software, Microsoft HoloLens, which allows an in-depth study of the human body. Users can select a specific tissue, open and enlarge it. They can also travel through the vessels and organs thanks to the highly immersive experience.

Another great example is Froggipedia, an app that can easily replace the dissection of a real frog.

But the health industry isn’t the only one that can benefit from AR/VR technology. There’s a myriad of science apps that help students study without having to commute anywhere or put themselves in danger. Whether you want to become a Geology teacher or a college paper writer who helps people with assignments, VR is an amazing opportunity.

A good example is the study of a tornado, a tsunami, or some other natural catastrophe. On the other hand, VR can also recreate the natural habitat of hard-to-reach animals living underground, in water, or specific constructions such as beehives. Users can zoom in or isolate different parts without the risk of getting stung.

The benefit of remote and immersive reality is that students can keep practicing even when distance learning is preferred.

Using VR For Visiting Inaccessible Places Or Times

As previously mentioned, through VR, students can visit places that are hard to reach. This includes places from the past that no longer look the way they used to. For instance, BBC has created a virtual experience of one of the raids of Nazi Germany: 1943 Berlin Blitz in 360°. The raid is presented using actual footage and recordings mixed with virtual graphics and a 360° view that gives the user a feel of what it meant to witness the war from a plane.

Another hard-to-reach place could be Mount Everest: organizing a school trip there would cost a lot of time, funds and would be dangerous. Thankfully, we have Google Expeditions that can give users a chance to visit Everest, the Louvre, or other places without any risk, effort, or wasting money and time.

Using VR For Language Learning And Working Together

VR and AR can also help with language learning. People who want to study a foreign language can engage in a virtual experience where they learn new words and practice conversations with real users or virtual ones. This can help reduce the fear of mispronouncing words while immersed in a new culture. For instance, imagine if you learn Italian while virtually walking through Rome. It’s pleasurable, but you’re in the comfort of your own home.

On the other hand, international students can use AR to understand teachers better: subtitles or voiceovers can generate while the teacher is speaking. This way, anyone can learn at any university, without knowing the teacher’s language.

Lastly, VR can be used for group writing and conferences. Users can gather in a virtual space and work together from home. For instance, people who work at a law firm, Superiorpapers, or a design company can team up in a digital space, even if each member lives in different areas of the world.

AR For Interactive Learning Though Games

Everyone likes games: whether you’re a child, an adult, or an elder, playing games is fun. But if you mix learning and playing, you can have fun while learning something new. So, through AR and VR, users can learn new things in a tailored environment that features memory games, puzzles, crosswords, and more.

A playful interface keeps students locked in, focused on what they’re hearing or seeing. This happens because students go through a complete experience of actively participating instead of passively studying theory. They engage better with the subject and remember a significant quantity of information. Moreover, as people grow more familiar with technology, they already know how to handle it and feel close to it from the start.

For example, a class in Geology can turn into a VR game of trekking and finding out about minerals in nature. Gamers can collect rewards and unlock new levels by completing tasks and discovering new gems. The game can also feature informative steps where the user stops and reads information: they’re learning, but they’re also motivated to look for clues and unlock the next level.

Specifically, children can learn to become responsible, observant and instead of feeling rivalry towards other students, they’re focused on their next reward.

Moreover, VR and AR can isolate the student from their home distractions: toys, TV, relatives, etc.

Using VR For Learning Disabilities

Traditional learning methods are not for everyone. Some people have learning disabilities that make regular learning even less efficient than it already is. A good example is dyslexic students who have a difficult time reading. In this case, images become the primary source of information. Also, students with autism can benefit from having fewer distractions and being immersed in a controlled environment, where sounds and images are thought through to reduce triggers.

Deaf children can have an animated interpreter that helps them learn, while blind children can have audio guides. Children who are physically disabled can also take part in virtual trips with their peers.

This way of learning can build better bridges between students, normalizing diversity and offering an efficient learning experience to all children.Moreover, students can connect with their tutors, Proessaywriting writers, and helpers online. They can do homework as if they’re present in class or right there with their teacher.

Sources

https://www.infobase.com/blog/featured/5-practical-uses-of-ar-and-vr-in-distance-learning/

https://www.viewsonic.com/library/education/6-benefits-and-5-examples-of-augmented-reality-in-education/ 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2021/07/23/10-best-examples-of-vr-and-ar-in-education/?sh=3e8df4b41f48 

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